Train Your Dog TV – Episode 3 – Jumping

15 comments Written on October 12th, 2010 by
Categories: Jumping

In this third episode of Train Your Dog TV, Eric Letendre, "The Amazing Dog Training Man," goes in depth on the topic of JUMPING. Jumping is a problem faced by many dog owners, especially owners of young, larger breed dogs. Watch this episode to learn how to stop your dog or puppy from jumping on you, your family and your guests. Eric also answers your dog training questions. Make sure you watch the video to get the details on how to ask Eric your dog training question.

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15 comments “Train Your Dog TV – Episode 3 – Jumping”

Awesome technique. I have this problem with people who meet my dog. I’ve trained her not to jump and then you get that ‘one’ person that gets your dog to jump up. The worse part is that at first they praised the dog for doing this and then the next few times they come over, the dog jumps on them but this time they don’t want it to and they want to know why it keeps jumping on them. (this is frustrating) I will definitely be retraining my dog with this technique. Thank you so much.

This technique does NOT work with my 12-month-old wild and crazy Airedale Terrier. When I grab his paws, he BITES MY HANDS. And he isn’t playing! He is constantly jumping all over me and BITING me. He is way too big for this to be at all funny or cute. It’s very bad. I’ve had him for 4 months; he was 9 months old when I adopted him. I believe he was taught to jump and bite and play tug-of-war as a puppy, before I got him. But now NOTHING makes him stop this behavior, I’m at the end of my rope with him. I’ve done a lot of research into dog training tactics to find a way to rectify the problem, and every single one has failed. He is relentless. I can’t do anything with him. It’s a nightmare. My own dog attacks me! He bruises me and makes me bleed on a daily basis. He weighs over 60 pounds and I’m a 98 pound woman. I also have two children and I’m afraid he will hurt them. If I can’t get beyond this awful situation, there is no way I can keep this dog. I’ve tried everything. I don’t give up easily, and I really do love the dog in spite of his wild behavior. But I don’t know what else to do at this point…
Any further help you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

I just figured out that I could reply directly…I commented this a few minutes ago, but this is a better place for it.

This is to the woman with the Airedale Terrier – my husband and I recently adopted a 10 month old doberman mix. When we got him at the shelter, he was named “Bouncer” – and this did not mean the type of bouncer you would find at a club. He jumped like crazy and he’s a 60 lb dog, so it’s a little scary. We tried the technique on this video and had the same result, he would try to bite our hands and was not getting frustrated at all. He seemed to think it was a giant game. We tried a new technique that has worked very well. It’s essentially a time-out method. We dog-proofed one of the rooms in our house that is secluded and away from the main action. This is not the same room he sleeps in, because we do not want him to have a negative association with that room. Anyway, anytime he jumped at all, we would simply take him by the collar and put him in that room for a time out. The times vary – anywhere from 30 seconds to a minute. The we simply let him back out. This technique stopped the majority of his jumping in just a few days. He still occasionally gets very excited and will jump, but we just keep with the technique. Good luck!

The problem I have with this technique is that the dog will associate your hands on their paws with an unpleasant feeling, then when you go to trim nails or get a sticker out of their paws, they have the memory of associating your hands on their paws with discomfort. I do agree that the patience required to reward good behavior and ignore the jumping behavior is the most positive (using no aversion technique), however it would be nice to have a faster way for most people, especially in dangerous situations. I use calming signals and canine ritualization signals to let the dog know it isn’t acceptable and it works very fast. I also train the association of the signal “off” with all four on the floor. Too many people say off when the dog is in the jumping position hence the dog actually associates that position with the signal of “off” instead of the position we really want them in! Once the association is learned, the signal can be used very easily when the dog jumps.

Excellent technique. I have taught my dog not to jump on peaople,by the old fashion method of kneeing every time she jumped,and would not allow her to jump on people.
My grand daughter comes along and plays with the chihuahua and wonders why the GSP wants to do the same.It took a while for her to get the message.I wish I had known your technique earlier
I will still give it a go.I tried to make her jump up.But she hesitated,Idid not persue it any further.
Thank you for this excellent info

Hi, Thanks for the information on stopping your dog from jumping.
It’s working with my large, 70 pound shepard.

What I REALLY need to know…is HOW TO STOP HIM FROM DIGGING AND BURYING EVERYTHING!
My beautiful yard looks like a neglected wasteland! Help!

It must be so frustrating Toni, however, it’s natural for a dog to dig and bury, Ie the pack hiding food, have you considered, giving yer dog a small fenced off part of the garden, that way you are sharing your beautiful yard with your dog, I’m sure you will get results soon after.

Hi, thanks for the great info! We have a mini poodle who only weighs about 7 pounds but can (and does!) jump all the way into your arms whenever we get home. It was cute at first, but it’s a bit frustrating for my daughters who are much smaller (ages 2 and 4) It has reached a point where we have to open the door while holding the girls so that my dog wont jump all over them. We have started to use your technique and have found it to be very useful thus far.
I was wondering if you had any thoughts on stealing… my dog is very polite and would never take food left on a table or counter, unless… we leave.
He has jumped up, grabbed the butter dish off the counter, got the lid off and eaten A LOT of butter (almost 1/2 a pound!) He has done this kind of thing a few times now… last time, he got the lid off a Starbucks coffee (to have some coffee with his doughnut) and opened up a container to get out a blueberry fritter in the car and had some of that in the span of just a few minutes alone!
I don’t know how to stop this! We got him at 9 months old and have had him for 4 months… Please help! It is funny at times, but it’s so frustrating and we worry that he might get really sick… he has vomited after these occasions before already. We all love him to bits and just want him to stay healthy.

Hi Eric, Thanks so much for the tips on jumping. It is totally working on my labradoodle. We had tried several things but this worked almost immediately. Great advice. I do have a question about recall. Our labradoodle is fantastic at coming when called in our backyard she responds beautifully but if she escapes out the front of our house or if she is at the off leash dog park she is awful. She never comes back when called regardless of what treats I have. It is becoming very frustrating. Could you help?? Thanks

This is to the woman with the Airdale Terrier – my husband and I recently adopted a 10 month old doberman mix. When we got him at the shelter, he was named “Bouncer” – and this did not mean the type of bouncer you would find at a club. He jumped like crazy and he’s a 60 lb dog, so it’s a little scary. We tried the technique on this video and had the same result, he would try to bite our hands and was not getting frustrated at all. He seemed to think it was a giant game. We tried a new technique that has worked very well. It’s essentially a time-out method. We dog-proofed one of the rooms in our house that is secluded and away from the main action. This is not the same room he sleeps in, because we do not want him to have a negative association with that room. Anyway, anytime he jumped at all, we would simply take him by the collar and put him in that room for a time out. The times vary – anywhere from 30 seconds to a minute. The we simply let him back out. This technique stopped the majority of his jumping in just a few days. He still occasionally gets very excited and will jump, but we just keep with the technique. Good luck!

My dog is a rescued large breed. We can tell that he was abused and beaten by his behavior to this day. He’s in great shape now but he is a very skittish and needy dog. I work from home so he’s around me all day. He has separation anxiety whenever I leave. He literally follows every step I take and right on my heals, sometimes nipping my rear end. Sometimes he will go lay down but as soon as I move, he’s up and right there with me. When my husband and I are talking or sitting together, he is right there trying to get attention and hovers incessantly. We try to get him to lay down on his bed which is near us, give him chew toys, put him out in his huge back yard, etc. but nothing works for any period of time. It’s getting frustrating.

I have bought and read your book. Any suggestions?

Hi Eric, as always great videos! However this is what I believe, we may have the knowledge of animals, and we all posses the skill to understand our animals, so hear go’s I believe for every sense we have, a dog has the same senses, that being said, it’s not us training the dog, it’s the dog training us, showing us, if you like, who they are, and how they behave, I believe in your saying, ” It’s not bad dog behaviour” it’s us that deem the actions of our dog’s bad behaviour, that being said, we need to encourage our animals what is socially acceptable to us.

We made the mistake of allowing our Mini Aussie to lick our plates when we were done eating. As you may guess this quickly evolved into impatient whining and barking to hurry us along so he could have our plate. We tried stopping cold turkey and not giving him the plates but the whining and barking became worse. In order to get some peace while we eat I started putting his kibble in a bowl and having him sit next to me. I started out by giving him a piece of his food every few seconds and have spaced the time out gradually. When we are done eating the leftover kibble goes in his bowl for him to finish. My goal is for him to wait till we are done and then I feed him.

Hi, very interesting video on jumping and I thought the method was working as my dog, a golden Lab, has stopped jumping up in front of people. Unfortunately she now jumps at peoples backs, which is more dangerous especially for children and elderly people. Any suggestions? Cheers

My GSD Pharaoh unfortunately has a bad jumping problem. I did try your technique and I think its working, but a few quick questions. What do you do if as soon as you let him down and say “off”, b4 you get a chance to say “good dog” he jumps back up again…. This is what’s been happening, no sooner does his front paws hit the ground is it up on me again.
The second question, do you literally hold his paws (like where the pads are) or can I hold above that?
My third issue, is that as soon as I hold his paws/ upper limbs, he takes my wrist in his mouth…. is this the struggling sign that I let him down and say “off”


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